Patrick M. Lydon

Founding Director // American ecological artist and image-maker, Patrick resides in Osaka, Japan, where he and his wife run The Branch, an urban farm and ecological art lab. He holds an MFA from The University of Edinburgh, and previously studied at Aichi University of Arts, and California State University San Jose, and spent several years learning from nature and elders as a nomad in East Asia. He has written for YES! Magazine, Resilience, and is the arts & events editor at The Nature of Cities.
A City, Designed by Trees

A City, Designed by Trees

Seeing trees as sacred is not an anomaly, it’s the fact that our culture has somehow lost this fellowship that’s an anomaly. If trees are a keystone of our wellness, why not learn to listen to their voice? If we did, how might the things we hear transform the landscape of our city over time? What would a city look like if it were designed by trees?

The Branch, Osaka

The Branch, Osaka

An ecological art lab and pocket farm located in Osaka, Japan conceived and built by Patrick M. Lydon and Suhee Kang with help from donors and volunteers from Japan and around the world. The space hosts community workshops and exhibitions by an international cast of resident artists, all aimed at re-kindling our relationship with nature.

Building an Ecology of One

Building an Ecology of One

Our systems of production and consumption have become so far separated from ecological reality, that sustainability and human well being have both become impossibilities. What needs to change, and how do we re-write the rules to build a truly sustainable culture?

Workshop / Nature Mandala

Workshop / Nature Mandala

A team building exercise where groups work together to build a giant mandala from locally-foraged natural materials, celebrating local nature, and building stronger relationships with the environment and each other.

Workshop / Plant and Place

Workshop / Plant and Place

Participants learn simple ways to preserve and use plants to make postcards, exploring the shapes, textures, and colors of local plants, and using them to tell the story of places in more delicate and intimate ways than a traditional postcard.